• Ross Mondon

Misao McGregor's - Kid In The Corner

As we wind down the days of 2020, Los-Angeles based Misao McGregor rewinds the past 24 years within an intimate yet compelling debut album Kid In The Corner.

Twisting and turning throughout an eleven-track album, McGregor provides a voice for those who feel marginalized all whilst showcasing her unique and individual experience through the roots of indie-pop with a splash of soul soundscapes.


Leading with the young clip of '23 Hours Old' - a home movie of McGregor, when she was first born - they end up soothing into 'Blue boi', a raw reminiscent of her ex-relationship. From the condemning of her ex, "we fucked up a lot my dear and, uh we drank when the water wasn't clear" to the gleaming atmosphere of the detailed, piano chords as she is ready to take things forward: "come to the table when you're feeling unsteady and we'll hold each other up." McGregor comes to terms with her emotions, opening the vulnerability of the unfortunates of their relationship.

Becoming aware of her inner and most profound emotions, Kid In The Corner narrates her turbulence youths, that eventually becomes a relief as she finds comfort in her adulthood. Through an upbeat electro instrumental production that flows alongside her distinct vocals, McGregor plays between the irony of love songs and knowing the cliche within 'She Was Worlds Above Me'. Following through, McGregor draws a picture of her past experience from the themes to queerness, depression and cleansing - creating an auto-biographical that can resonate with the people who feel out of space but creating their own path within our society.

With minimalistic production that fits in perfectly with her detailed songwriting, McGregor proceeds through the empowering 'Runaway' whilst preserving her vocal performances that capture her honest, raw emotions. As we become deeper into her journey, McGregor travels through her own love story within 'Stay in the Desert'. Emphasised by the strength of the piano chords, McGregor horns between the feelings of losing someone she loves as she sings 'I don't want you to go away tonight."


Amidst the plane synths with the subdued piano pieces within 'Eight, lies beneath a story of her long-distance relationship with her mother. Functioning between levels of her emotions, McGregor becomes self-aware but, there's still a sense of heartbreak in the tone of her vocals. As we come to the end of McGregor debut album, there's still a sense of anger as she reclaims the past of trauma within 'Weather the Weather' and 'Eventually'. Both of which capture her permission to heal through the emphasis of her clarity of the production. To end the album, McGregor strips it down and opens the vulnerability as much as she can as she returns to the roots of just piano and voice through 'B Major'.


Kid In The Corner is a 38-minute of true wonder as Misao McGregor unwinds the bruises yet surprises of her life.